This Standard Oil Gas Pump Balloon Could Fetch a Top Price: Today’s Collectibles

Objects from the past always have stories to tell, and this month’s collectibles bring stories of how transportation, home life and society in general have changed in the last 150+ years. While gas pump balloons, lounge chairs, silver cigarette cases, and early electric lights may be quaint holdovers from the past, mammy jars are a chilling reminder of a more recent time, when racist propaganda was a place common.

A red and white glass bulb almost looks like a crown, with a red base, topped by a fleur-de-lis, with a white dome

This gasoline pump balloon was used on Standard Oil gasoline pumps from the 1930s through the 1950s.Courtesy of the collector.

Q. This Standard Oil red crown gas pump balloon came from a gas station in Minnesota. My dad worked for Standard Oil in the 1950s and ’60s and when that gas station was remodeled, the old balloons were thrown away and my dad salvaged a couple of them. This has been stored indoors since about 1970 and is in excellent condition. It stands approximately 16 inches tall and is approximately 16 inches wide.

KB, Southwest Portland

A. Your gas pump globe was used on Standard Oil gas pumps from the 1930s through the 1950s. The crown is made of milky glass, and the red paint probably means regular gas. At auction, you can expect a sale of $700 to $1,000 for your balloon, as it appears to be in excellent condition. An auto collectible dealer might ask for $1,500 or more. Because we were unable to find another example with the exact same paint scheme, a collector may pay a premium for such a variation.

Shown is an antique armchair with floral upholstery, exposed wooden legs and frame, and an ornate wood carving on top depicting flowers and leaves.

These chairs date from the Victorian period, around 1860-1880, and are in a Rococo Revival style.Courtesy of the collector.

We have a couple of chairs that have been in our family for close to 100 years. They stand 45 inches tall with a seat width of 18 inches and a seat height of 13 inches. They are in excellent condition and we do not believe they have been refinished or reupholstered.

CT, Lake Oswego

A. Your chairs date from the Victorian period, around 1860-1880, and are in a Rococo Revival style. They are likely to be American, although they may be of English origin, and the wood is probably hickory. These types of chairs were commonly seen in salons and would come in pairs. One of the two would have arms for gentlemen, and the other would be a chair like yours without arms, to accommodate the voluminous skirts of a woman of the time. At auction, you can expect an estimate of $400-$600 for the undamaged pair. A dealer who specializes in antique furniture may ask $1,400 to $2,000 if he is in excellent condition.

A green glass globe rests on a metal base.

This screen appears to be one that was retailed by the Pairpoint Glass Company of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and dates to 1905-1910.Courtesy of the collector.

Q. This is one of the first electric lamps my late wife bought from a little shop in Sellwood about 20 years ago. It has an attractive globe on four wire rod supports. It produces a very satisfying light and is attractive both on and off. Could you estimate its age and style period and its approximate value?

KP, Southeast Portland

A. Based on your photographs, your lamp shade appears to be one that was retailed by the Pairpoint Glass Company of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and dates to 1905-1910. The base appears to have been modified to suit this shade and was probably made by another company. At auction, the lamp could fetch between $250 and $350. If undamaged, a dealer may ask $600-$900, or even more if, upon inspection, the lamp base can be dated to the same period of 1905-1910.

An open box is shown with a divider at the bottom.

This sterling silver cigarette case was manufactured by Lebkuecher & Co. of Newark, New Jersey.Courtesy of the collector.

what I got this silver box at auction years ago. It has a split wood interior and is inscribed “Colonel EB Nichols, of Sub Sector L”. It is 2 1/2 inches wide, 6 inches long, and 3 1/2 inches deep. Can you tell me something about it?

HD, Gresham

A. This sterling silver cigarette case was made by Lebkuecher & Co. of Newark, New Jersey, which was in business from 1896 to 1909. It was apparently a gift from a military unit to Colonel Nichols. Basic searches turned up no further information about the colonel. At auction, you may see a sale for $200 to $300. A dealer who specializes in silver might ask for between $700 and $1,000, if he shows no damage.

The values ​​discussed for the items presented in this column were researched by Portland appraiser Jerry l. Dobesh, ASA, Senior Accredited Appraiser with the American Society of Appraisers, with a specialty designation in Antiques and Decorative Arts. His services include providing appraisals for estate taxes, charitable contributions, insurance scheduling and loss, and equitable distribution needs.

To find an appraiser, contact the American Society of Appraisers, the International Society of Appraisers, or the Association of Appraisers of America. The suggested estimates in this Collectibles column are for general information purposes only and may not be used as a basis for sales, insurance, or IRS purposes.

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